According to a global study of scientific teachers, children's science education should focus on imparting practical skills through classroom experiments, updating present curricula, and reexamining the test system.

Other important recommendations from the instructors include lowering the amount of information to allow for more in-depth learning and developing a stronger link between what is taught in the classroom and what is happening in the real world.

Current education can be overly theoretical, making it difficult for students to grasp the importance of science in everyday life.

The pandemic has pushed the importance of science in our lives to the forefront, and the study addresses this. We all had to educate ourselves and come to terms with new realities, whether it was data literacy to comprehend the figures or epidemiological modelling to predict what would happen next.

Teachers agreed that it is to help students become scientifically literate – by providing them with the knowledge and skills they need to make wise decisions and take positive action; to develop problem-solving skills and knowledge; to ensure that students understand, enjoy, and be happy in the world around them; and to inspire a desire to explore.

Teachers also agreed that current science education systems around the world adequately prepare their pupils for the futures they are expected to confront.

Changes in the way science is taught, such as embedding practical skills through classroom experiments and teaching specific topics in depth rather than more concepts but superficial, are significant recommendations for instructors. Current education can be overly theoretical, making it difficult for students to grasp the importance of science in everyday life. There is a need to create a deeper connection between the science taught in the classroom and what is happening in the world outside.

The examination system should also be reexamined by teachers. Student evaluation is currently too focused on material, according to the respondents, to the expense of evaluating students' capacity to apply what they have learned to real-world issues.

It is difficult to dispute with the centralised vision of science education stated in national policies and translated into syllabi and textbooks, but the mechanisms within which these ideas are delivered limit the amount of innovation that can actually happen in the classroom.

In general, only a certain type of student — either exceptionally curious and tenacious, or socioeconomically and culturally advantaged – manages to maintain a genuine interest in science as a subject of knowledge.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on scientific education, as well as everything else, by restricting students' access to tactile, tangible, and individually tailored parts of teaching and learning. However, it has opened up a world of online possibilities for a small minority.

Simultaneously, the pandemic has brought scientific concepts and ideas into sharp perspective – and, in some cases, placed a cost on those who don't grasp them, whether in a good or terrible way. People have been forced to discuss communicable diseases, healthcare data, preventive medicine, and the intricacies of vaccine development as a result of it.