In India, only one out of every four pupils have access to digital learning. Although edtech solutions for virtual learning are becoming more widely available, they remain out of reach for the millions of families who cannot afford a smartphone or high-speed internet.

While mobile and internet penetration is increasing across the country, and the education technology sector is growing, not every child is benefiting.

Although edtech solutions for virtual learning are becoming more widely available, they remain out of reach for the millions of families who cannot afford a smartphone or high-speed internet.

Students could benefit from these technologies today, more than ever, to close the learning gaps that have expanded as a result of the pandemic. According to a study by Azim Premji University, 92 percent of Indian youngsters have regressed in language acquisition and 82 percent have regressed in math.

Educators will need to establish a collaborative and supportive learning environment at school and at home as pupils return to school. We need a new approach to education technology that allows more youngsters to access digital information and continue their study online.

It's evident that there's a big need for edtech in India, where families of all income levels place a high value on education. According to Ed Week Market Brief, donors from around the world invested about $20 billion in education technology in 2021, three twice the amount invested the previous year. India's edtech investments exceeded $5.6 billion, making it a key player in the field.

The market for edtech in elementary and secondary schools accounts for around half of the total market. Companies claim to have reached up to 100 million users, or roughly 40% of India's school-aged population. School closures triggered by the pandemic have boosted these figures significantly.

In addition, there has been a lot of innovation in the last two years to remove access and usage hurdles for children from low-income families. Parents have taken on the job of teachers at home in the previous two years, while teachers have tried to keep their kids connected and interested from afar. AI and chatbots were used by companies like ConveGenius to enable remote conversations between teachers and students, as well as to assist parents in supporting their children. These businesses created weekly quizzes based on the subjects that students were studying and presented teachers with the results. For both professors and pupils, this mirrored the frequent feedback pattern of physical classrooms.

In the last two years, there has been a lot of innovation in removing barriers to access and usage for children from low-income homes. Parents have taken up the job of teachers at home in the previous two years, while teachers have attempted to keep their kids connected and interested from afar. ConveGenius, for example, used AI and chatbots to facilitate remote interactions between teachers and students, as well as to assist parents in supporting their children. These businesses conducted weekly quizzes on the materials that students were studying and provided teachers with the results. For both professors and pupils, this mimicked the frequent feedback cycle of physical classrooms.

As schools reopen, we'll need more on-the-ground innovation to realise edtech's full promise. Companies must concentrate on personalising education, extending it to the most remote corners of India, and assisting students who have fallen behind in their studies as a result of the pandemic. Initiatives such as the Bharat Ed Tech Initiative (BEI) are already looking into how to accomplish this.